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Certain vaccine types may increase the risk of other infections, particularly in girls

Summarised by Centrist

A preprint review suggests that post vaccination, there may be nonspecific effects (NSEs) to the immune system that increase the risk of infections unrelated to the targeted disease. 

Vaccines that do not contain a live or weakened pathogen are called non-live vaccines and were linked to more negative NSEs, potentially increasing susceptibility to other infections, especially in girls. 

According to Children’s Health Defense: 

“For example, girls receiving the non-live DTP vaccine died at twice the rate of unvaccinated girls according to one study, with a comparable disadvantage to vaccinated boys.”

Vaccines that do contain a live or weakened pathogen are called live-pathogen vaccines and include, for example, measles, mumps and rubella (which together form the paediatric measles, mumps, and rubella, or MMR, vaccine), plus yellow fever, varicella-zoster (chickenpox), BCG and some polio vaccines. Live-pathogen vaccines were associated with positive NSEs and are noted to  provide enhanced protection against some non-targeted infections.  

Yet, research suggests negative NSEs for live-pathogen vaccines as well, including febrile seizures, autism and breakthrough infections. 

Read more over Children’s Health Defense 

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