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New study states the obvious: Men have advantages over women in sport

Summarised by Centrist

We think the study’s title says it all: “The International Olympic Committee framework on fairness, inclusion and nondiscrimination on the basis of gender identity and sex variations does not protect fairness for female athletes”.

In the paper, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, the researchers challenge the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) 2021 assertion that male athletes don’t inherently possess an advantage over females. 

Bringing together research from various scientific disciplines such as evolutionary biology, physiology, and athletic performance, the researchers detail inherent (many would say “obvious”) developmental and performance differences between sexes. And this is before considering testosterone-related factors.

In regards to “the illusion of testosterone suppression”, the paper states that males with reduced testosterone levels still tend to be larger and stronger than females. Additionally, reducing testosterone levels does not alter characteristics such as height, bone length, or the width of hips and shoulders. Moreover, males tend to surpass females in athletic performance even before reaching puberty. This means the fundamental performance gaps between males and females persist. 

The researchers write: 

“We urge the IOC to reevaluate the recommendations of their Framework to include a comprehensive understanding of the biological advantages of male development to ensure fairness and safety in female sports.”

Read more over at The Federalist

Image: Tab59

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